The Hadozee

The Hadozee, also colloquially called “deck apes”, are simian humanoids with a membrane of skin between their arms and legs that allows them to glide. Hadozee originate from lands of lush jungles, and have a deep respect for nature and it’s beauties. However they love traveling and visiting ever more exotic locations. Hadozee now inhabit many far reaches as they frequently serve as mercenary crew members for ship and naval fleets.

Links:
– GMBinder source, constantly updated

Like all my brews on this blog, this is a carefully balanced, peer reviewed and playtested brew of the finest malt!
As always I’m glad to hear feedback and about any experiences using this brew for PCs or NPCs.

The Neogi

By request I wrote up a Neogi 5e player race for use with Spelljammer. This has yet to be properly play tested, it is most likely strong, but doesn’t seem inherently broken and over powered when compared with races like the Grung or even some Tieflings.

Links:
– GMBinder source, constantly updated

Like all my brews on this blog, this is a carefully balanced, peer reviewed and playtested brew of the finest malt! this one is 100% in early development!
As always I’m glad to hear feedback and about any experiences using this brew for PCs or NPCs.

Gambits, a quick way to spice 5e combat

I like exciting pulp-action combat, but standard 5e D&D combat can grow stale quick. So here is my simple combat rules “plug-in” to spice up the game for everyone.

These are codified from a few years DMing with these rules in an informal way. But I finally codified them now, and call them Gambits. Feel free to use this concept wholesale or just steal the core concepts and run with your own. The goal is to make combat more fun and exciting without bogging down in too many rules. 

Semantically a gambit is when someone sacrifices a resource or an opportunity to achieve a potential upper hand in a conflict.

Using Tactical Gambits

In nutshell gambits are small tactical choices you can take in exchange for taking disadvantage on the attack. It’s basically a gamble. You can only use one gambit per turn, AND only when you don’t already have disadvantage. Thanks to the trade-off they balance out with vanilla combat, and newer players won’t be losing out just because they are simply swinging their sword. It’s an opt-in/opt-out rule set that anyone can decide to use or not use at any time.

The design prerogative of gambits is to not change the balance of the game; and they are not meant to replace or invalidate any core rules like fighting styles, feats, existing combat actions, or classes like the battle master and their maneuvers. This works because the gambits allow a player to trade advantage or to take disadvantage on their attack roll for potential tactical benefits. This means that gambit benefits are curbed by the choice of taking a gamble. Thus both a player that actively embraces gambits, and a player that prefers to play it safe will be roughly equal in combat.

Links:
PDF, on google drive, version 1.0
GMBinder source, constantly updated

Like all my brews on this blog, this is a carefully balanced, peer reviewed and playtested brew of the finest malt!
As always I’m glad to hear feedback and about any experiences using this brew for PCs or NPCs.

My Death and Dying rules

A bleeding man suddenly walks through the doors of the tavern.. holding his side as he extends his hand trying to perch on to a table, but slips and tumbles to the ground. The Rogue then hurries up to see what has happened to the poor sod, but it’s too late…

The above scene is something that happens in countless books, and movies, but in D&D this sort of situation doesn’t make sense and players will be forced to suspend disbelief. Because it obviously cannot happen if we follow the death and dying rules in the Players Handbook.

I prefer, and believe others do too, the possibility of a smoother transition between dying and dead. But hopefully one that doesn’t change the overall balance of the game. So I present here my current working solution:


Hitting 0 hp

When you hit 0 hp, you can roll a Constitution saving throw DC 10. On a success you remain conscious, but incapacitated and prone. If you fail the check you are unconscious. In either case you are dying and must roll death saving throw at the end of each of your turns.

Recovering from unconscious at 0 hp

When a character recovers from being unconscious at 0 hp, or being dead, they are prone, and stunned until the start of their next turn.

(The recovering character losing their immediate turn because they are stunned has an immediate, and serious, tactical consideration. Without the typical and troublesome book keeping of applying exhaustion levels to people that have fallen)

Condition: Prone + Stunned

  • A stunned creature is incapacitated, can’t move, and can speak only falteringly.
  • Incapacitated means: An incapacitated creature can’t take actions or reactions.
  • An attack roll against the creature has advantage if the attacker is within 5 feet of the creature. Otherwise, the attack roll has disadvantage.
  • Attack rolls against the creature have advantage. (This advantage and prone range counters prone ranged disadvantage)
  • The creature automatically fails Strength and Dexterity saving throws.
  • A prone creature’s only movement option is to crawl, unless it stands up and thereby ends the condition.

Dohwar, the legendary Penguin folk of the D&D universe

The Dohwar, are probably one of my favorite races to come out of the Spelljammer setting. In 2e they didn’t actually get stats as a race, as they were released in the 2nd Spelljammer Monster Manual, shortly before TSR stopped working on Spelljammer. But honestly… Mind Reading Corporate Mafia Penguins are just too much fun to relegate to NPCs. So here are stats to play them in 5e. They are fun and unique enough that I think DM’s should place them on all worlds, and not relegate them to Wildspace 🐧

Links:
– PDF, on google drive, version 1.0
– GMBinder source, constantly updated

Colder of Colder & Shilly, a Dohwar Artificer

Like all my brews on this blog, this is a carefully balanced, peer reviewed and playtested brew of the finest malt!
As always I’m glad to hear feedback and about any experiences using this brew for PCs or NPCs.

The Exiled Illithid

Because Spelljammer, where Illithid are actually common, I made a playable race for Illithid. They are illitihid that for one reason or another are no longer members of a colony, and lost the link with their Elder Brain.

Obviously Illithid are too powerful to fit into the budget of a normal 5e D&D race. However when you think of it, the illithid in the Monster Manual is an individual that is clearly not equivalent to a level 1 character, same as a human Veteran has abilities that are far above those of an average 1st level human.
My solution? I boiled down the illithid to as basic a race as possible, while still maintaining an unmistakable illithid feel, and added 2 racial feats that unlock features that will bring a character closer to what the Monster Manual Illithid looks like. So in theory say an 8th level Illithid Wizard with both feats will feel very much like playing a Monster Manual illithid.

Links:
PDF, on google drive, version 1.0
GMBinder source, constantly updated

Ol’zex the Lead Guitarist of “Mind Flayers”

Like all my brews on this blog, this is a carefully balanced, peer reviewed and playtested brew of the finest malt!
As always I’m glad to hear feedback and about any experiences using this brew for PCs or NPCs.

Giff, Space Mercenaries

Here is the Giff race of my Spelljammer games.
Most other brews out there give Giff the ability to ignore the loading property of firearms at level 1, but that is almost as good as giving them the crossbow expert feat at level 1, which when compounded with the rest of the racial package is quite a bit. Instead I have given them firearms training at level 1, and the faux crossbow expert free loading benefit at 3rd level, to keep things balanced.

Links:
PDF on google drive, currently version 1.1
GMBinder source, constantly updated

Giff, Masters of the Universe

Like all my brews on this blog, this is a carefully balanced, peer reviewed and playtested brew of the finest malt!
As always I’m glad to hear feedback and about any experiences using this brew for PCs or NPCs.